How clean are your floors?

Frequently Asked Tile & Grout Questions

1. How much do you charge?

The price for tile and grout cleaning is based on several elements such as the type of stone (manmade, ie: ceramic/porcelain; or natural stone, ie: travertine or marble), amount of square footage, distance of travel, single story home or first floor condo, furnished or empty dwelling. We encourage customers to call around for pricing. Our prices tend to run ten to fifty cents less per square foot than most competitors. There are a few companies that charge slightly less but they are mainly carpet cleaners whose equipment was built to clean carpets, not stone. We do not clean green marble, saltillo, wood, or VCT.
 
2. How much do you charge to clean a small area?

I have to take out the same amount of equipment whether I'm cleaning five square feet or five thousand square feet so I do have a minimum charge of $150.00
 
3. How does your process work?

There are four elements to the cleaning process. We spray a citrus based emulsifier, a cleaning agent that soaks into the grout or natural stone and helps break up deposits of dirt and oils that accumulate over time. We then go over the area with our machine which uses high pressure heated water and vacuum to lift dirt that has penetrated below the surface.
 
4. How are you different from other tile and grout cleaners?

Equipment. The machine I use was built for cleaning stone and runs at a higher temperature and pressure than most other machines. The water comes out at 210 degrees. Anything over 180 degrees will kill bacteria. There are a lot of carpet cleaners that have purchased a tool that attaches to the end of the hose and claim that they can clean tile and grout. It simply comes down to equipment. Their machine was built to clean carpet and will not clean stone as effectively. 
 
5. How long will the floors remain wet?

Is there a lot of water? The machine vacuums as it cleans so the amount of water is minimal, similar to if you used a spray bottle. We then use floor directed air movers to dry the remainder of the surface.
 
6. Does the machine use brushes?

No. This system is more advanced than the old brush cleaning systems and has two enclosed jet heads that spin at 200 rpms.

7. Is there any risk of damage to my floor?

No. If your tile or grout is not broken the machine will not do any damage. If you have broken or loose grout the vacuum may lift those pieces out. We inspect the surfaces to be cleaned before doing any work and will advise the owner beforehand if we observe damaged tile or grout.
 
8. Should I seal my tile or grout?

If you have natural stone tile you will definitely want to seal it. If you have a man made tile such as ceramic or porcelain, this tile is made to be non-porous in the glazing process by the manufacturer. Grout is cement and is porous like natural stone. I don't recommend sealing grout to everyone. Sealing grout is an upsell for any company and some people will tell you that you have to seal your grout. You seal grout for two reasons. If you spill something that is acidic or might cause permanent stains such as grape juice, red wine, coffee, etc. having your grout sealed gives you time to clean up a spill before it penetrates into the grout. The second reason to seal grout is that it helps keep dirt on the surface making cleaning easier. The drawback in sealing grout is that sealants don't last as long as you would like. The sealant I use is a water based sealant that does not change the look or feel of the grout. It is made by a well established company that makes high quality sealants. They claim that their sealant lasts five years. Depending on how often you clean, the types of cleaners you use, the amount of traffic and humidity in your house, you're more likely to get three to four years from a sealant. If you have your floors professionally cleaned and keep up with general maintenance you shouldn't need to have them professionally cleaned again for three to four years. I do recommend sealing grout in the kitchen which tends to have the highest amount of traffic and spills. I also recommend grout sealing for people with pets that spend time outdoors or have urinating problems and for houses with high amounts of traffic. I have three boys and two dogs and numerous out of town guests, so I seal the grout in the high traffic areas of my house.

9. Do you recommend color sealing?

I NEVER recommend color sealing. Color sealing grout is basically putting latex paint on cement. It makes your floor look like new initially. The problem comes a few years later when the paint begins to peel and you have two different colors. Removing color sealant is usually an expensive and labor intensive process using floor stripper.

10. How do I maintain my floor after a professional cleaning?

I believe steam cleaners such as the Shark work well in maintaining a clean floor. You have to remember that the more liquid you use the more dirt gets trapped when it soaks into the grout or other porous stone. If you want to use a cleaner I recommend a ph neutral product such as Pinesol, Lysol, Mr. Clean, or Spic & Span. Don't ever use acidic products such as bleach or vinegar. They will damage your grout over time and etch natural stone. If a cleaning product has warnings to wear gloves and a mask it is most likely an acid. Alkaline cleaners are great at attracting dirt, but if you don't rinse them off completely they will continue to attract dirt from shoes or feet. Stick with the ph neutral cleaners.

11. Why should I hire you?

See the 'reviews' page on our website. These customer comments speak volumes. We clean each floors as if it were our own. We are professional, timely, dependable, licensed, insured, and meticulous in our cleaning. We go above and beyond customer expectations. We are a local owner/operated small business. If you're looking for the cheapest price don't call us. Call a carpet cleaner that mails out coupons. If you're looking for the best work at a fair price, look no further. You just found the  best tile and grout cleaning company in Southwest Florida. 
 
*Questions are free. Feel free to contact us with any questions you may have.
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